TITLE

Fronius technology saves GM time and money

PUB. DATE
September 2009
SOURCE
Automotive Manufacturing Solutions;Sep/Oct2009, Vol. 10 Issue 5, p58
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Case Study
ABSTRACT
The article presents a case study on the use of Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) technology from Fronius in the welding and brazing of vehicle parts at General Motors' Ellesmore Port plant. It is stated that the CMT solution has eliminated rework costs and has allowed savings on spare parts and use of space. The use of the system by the plant in solving a productivity bottleneck at the door stage is also discussed.
ACCESSION #
44769335

 

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