TITLE

Klebsiella Meningitis A Case Report

AUTHOR(S)
Medhi, N.; Goswami, P.; Sarma, P.; Barkataky, R. K.; Duarah, R.; Saikia, R.
PUB. DATE
June 2008
SOURCE
Neuroradiology Journal;Jun2008, Vol. 21 Issue 3, p323
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Case Study
ABSTRACT
Acute bacterial meningitis is a severe CNS infection occurring mostly in infants and older children. Bacterial meningitis caused by gram-negative bacteria is usually fatal. Klebsiella pneumoniae is an uncommon gram-negative bacteria causing meningitis with a poor outcome. Though the commonest presentation of bacterial meningitis is fever, patients usually seek medical attention for uncontrolled seizure and features of raised ICP. The commonest complications of gram-negative bacterial meningitis including Klebsiella meningitis are subdural hygroma / empyema, hydrocephalus, infarcts (both arterial and venous) and cortical blindness due to hypoxic ischaemic insult. MRI is the best modality for evaluating these patients for early diagnosis. Early institution of treatment significantly reduces the mortality and morbidity. We describe a case of acute bacterial meningitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae with MR evidence of sinus thrombosis, venous infarcts and subdural hygroma.
ACCESSION #
38011782

 

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