TITLE

Successful Management of Gorham-Stout Disease in the Cervical Spine by Combined Conservative and Surgical Treatments: A Case Report

AUTHOR(S)
Satoshi Tateda; Toshimi Aizawa; Ko Hashimoto; Haruo Kanno; Susumu Ohtsu; Eiji Itoi; Hiroshi Ozawa
PUB. DATE
April 2017
SOURCE
Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine;Apr2017, Vol. 241 Issue 4, p249
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Case Study
ABSTRACT
Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) is a rare condition characterized by intraosseous proliferation of endotheliallined vessels and progressive osteolysis. The precise etiology and pathophysiology of the disease remain poorly understood. Current therapeutic options for GSD include chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgical resection, but the surgical treatment of GSD is difficult, especially in the spinal lesion. The indication of wide-margined resection was limited because of anatomical features. Herein, we report a case of GSD of the cervical spine in which the lesions were successfully stabilized with combined conservative and surgical treatments. A 15-year-old male patient was admitted because of severe neck pain. The patient presented no neurological deficiency. However, the radiological findings revealed osteolytic lesions on the laminae and vertebrae between C1 to C5. An open biopsy confirmed an irregular, thin-walled vessel formation in the bone trabeculae, which was diagnosed as GSD. Conservative treatment was initiated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. After one and a half year, the osteolytic condition had regressed. Spinal fusion surgery was then performed from C2 to C5 to prevent for progression of the cervical kyphotic changes, and spinal fusion was confirmed 7 months after the surgery. The patient showed no recurrence of GSD in the 5-year follow-up period after surgery. We were able to provide successful treatment by giving priority to the combined conservative treatments. If a patient has no severe deformity or progressive neurologic deficits, it might be better to prioritize conservative treatments and to perform the surgery after the osteolytic changes have stopped.
ACCESSION #
122468773

 

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