TITLE

The Impulse Factor

AUTHOR(S)
Tasler, Nick
PUB. DATE
January 2010
SOURCE
Impulse Factor - Business Book Summaries;2010, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Book Summary
DOC. TYPE
Book Summary
ABSTRACT
Including research into genetics, psychology, history, and the animal world, The Impulse Factor offers perspective into the reasoning behind people's decisions. There are two factors in every decision: the decision maker and the situation. Readers are invited to take the online Impulse Factor Test(tm) to determine whether they are cautious "risk managers" or impulsive "potential seekers." The majority of people fall in to the risk manager category, but nearly one-quarter of the population carries a gene called the "novelty seeking gene." These people are genetically predisposed to impulsive behavior. Research shows that people in this minority tend to act in ways that either lead them to be successful or can get them into big trouble. Risk managers tend to be more careful when making decisions; they take stock of the risks involved and use the information they have to aid in the decision-making process. However, risk managers sometimes have trouble coming to a decision in a timely matter because they focus too much on all the details. Potential seekers excel at making decisions quickly under pressure; they are more apt to take larger risks in order to secure larger gain. Their risk-taking behavior can either lead to huge success or failure. It is important for potential seekers to question themselves and reflect on past decisions in order to benefit from their risk taking. Because there are an infinite number of situations out there, it is impossible to predict the outcome of most decisions. However, Tasler offers advice to readers on how to make better decisions based on where they fall on the Impulse Factor scale. Instead of working against their natural tendencies, decision makers should work with them for the best results.
ACCESSION #
47590246

 

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