TITLE

Why Some Companies Emerge Stronger and Better from a Crisis

AUTHOR(S)
Mitroff, Ian I.
PUB. DATE
June 2005
SOURCE
Why Some Companies Emerge Stronger & Better from a Crisis - Busi;2005, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Book Summary
DOC. TYPE
Book Summary
ABSTRACT
In an age of terrorism, cyber attacks, and large-scale corporate fraud, crisis is no longer a question of if, but of when, according to author Ian Mitroff, an internationally recognized crisis management authority. While many companies have done a great deal since the events of 9/11 to reassess their physical, strategic, and financial vulnerabilities, there remains a huge gap between risk management and business continuity planning and true proactive crisis management. To withstand a crisis, and to come through it with strength and confidence, companies need seven key competencies. First, crises exact tremendous emotional costs, and as a result they demand exceptional emotional capacity and resilience. We have to accept the inevitability of crisis beforehand to more effectively handle the shock and grief after an event. Second, because they destroy structure and order, crises demand that we be capable of exercising on-the-spot creative thinking, the kind of thinking that may be described as "outside of the box that contains the box." Third, effective crisis management requires a special type of inner spiritual strength on the part of organizations and people that prepares them to deal with recovery and the healing process-before a crisis strikes. Fourth, effective crisis management requires skills on the part of an organization's leaders to understand how factors outside the company and the industry can affect the organization profoundly. Fifth, crises demand that we know different things and do things differently. We have to learn, for example, how to think like terrorists think. We have to question every assumption in order to reveal potential crises and find ways to avert, or handle, the effects of those crises. Sixth, effective crisis management requires that we realize that crises are experienced differently reconcile priorities within an organization, so that everyone can act with common purpose when a crisis strikes. Finally, we have to reconsider our traditional corporate structures that handle crises; we have to move toward an overarching, ongoing discipline of crisis management.
ACCESSION #
17288845

 

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