TITLE

The Toyota Way

AUTHOR(S)
Liker, Jeffrey K.
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
Toyota Way - Business Book Summaries;2004, Vol. 21 Issue 12, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Book Summary
DOC. TYPE
Book Summary
ABSTRACT
Everyone in the auto industry is so familiar with Toyota�s dramatic business success and world-renowned quality that, as Liker points out, many consider the company to be �boring,� with its steadily growing sales, consistent profitability, huge cash reserves, operational efficiency (combined with constant innovation), and top quality, year after year. But, despite this reputation as the best manufacturer in the world, and despite the huge influence of the lean movement, most attempts to emulate and implement lean production have been fairly superficial, with less than stellar results over the long term. �Dabbling at one level�the �Process� level,� U.S. companies have embraced lean tools, but do not understand what makes them work together in a system.
Liker believes that Toyota�s consistent success is a direct result of its turning operational excellence into a strategic weapon, using such tools and quality improvement methods as just-in-time (JIT) and one-piece flow (that make up the Toyota Production System [TPS]). But its continued success at implementing these tools comes from its philosophy (The Toyota Way) which is based on an understanding of people and what motivates them. Thus, the company�s achievement ultimately emerges from its ability to cultivate leadership, teamwork, and culture, to devise strategy, to build supplier relationships, and to maintain a learning organization. In this manner, the Toyota Way and the TPS form the �double helix� of the company�s �DNA,� defining its management style and what is unique about the company.
The Toyota Way describes the 14 principles that form the foundation of this uniquely successful management style, using profiles of a diverse group of organizations, from a variety of industries. It demonstrates how this model of success can be applied in any organization, to improve the quality, efficiency, and speed of any business process. In the first business book in English to provide a blueprint of Toyota�s management philosophy for general business readers, Liker explains how to create a Toyota-style culture of quality, lean, and learning that takes quantum leaps beyond any superficial focus on tools and techniques. Thus, it is an extremely accessible blueprint, offering managers in blue-collar, white-collar, manufacturing, or service environments specific tools and methods for becoming the best in their industries on cost, quality, and service.
ACCESSION #
16898462

 

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