TITLE

Writing Zion

AUTHOR(S)
Felstiner, John
PUB. DATE
June 2006
SOURCE
New Republic;6/5/2006 - 6/12/2006, Vol. 234 Issue 21/22, p25
SOURCE TYPE
Review
DOC. TYPE
Book Review
ABSTRACT
In this article the author discusses the exchange of letters between the poets Paul Celan and Yehuda Amichai. Celan, a holocaust survivor, found refuge in Paris after the Second World War, but continued to write in German. Amichai left Germany in 1936 and settled in Israel where he wrote in Hebrew.
ACCESSION #
21090853

 

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