TITLE

Toro! Toro! Toro! (Book)

AUTHOR(S)
Lingeman, Richard R.
PUB. DATE
October 1974
SOURCE
New Republic;10/5/74, Vol. 171 Issue 14, p25
SOURCE TYPE
Review
DOC. TYPE
Book Review
ABSTRACT
Reviews the book "Toro! Toro! Toro!," by William Hjortsberg.
ACCESSION #
10298223

 

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