TITLE

FUNGI AND LICHENS

AUTHOR(S)
Burnie, David
PUB. DATE
June 2006
SOURCE
Plant;2006, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
A chapter from the book "Plant" is presented. It describes fungi that look like plants but live differently by feeding on living things or the dead remains. It states that fungi can live in any kind of habitat, from soil, wood to the surface of human skin and can be spread through the shedding of spores. It points to lichens as a partnership between the fungi and the microscopic algae that can survive in tough conditions.
ACCESSION #
43662840

 

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