TITLE

CHAPTER ONE: "Clothed in Words": Margaret Atwood and Dress

AUTHOR(S)
Kuhn, Cynthia G.
PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
Self-Fashioning in Margaret Atwood's Fiction: Dress, Culture & I;2005, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
Chapter One of the book "Self-Fashioning in Margaret Atwood's Fiction: Dress, Culture and Identity" is presented. It examines the way in which Margaret Atwood relied on styling the self, or self-fashioning through dress, as a way of survival for her female protagonists. It discusses Atwood's use of fashion to emphasize the systems of power in societies and their effects on individuals, addressing everything from politics to consumerism to gender issues. In her fiction, Atwood challenges cultural paradigms, creates highly self-reflexive texts and plays with generic conventions. She also describes storytelling in terms of designing or weaving, which aligns her with a particularly female tradition.
ACCESSION #
19767267

 

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