TITLE

Chapter 8: On the Kentucky Side of the River

PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
Freedom Stairs;2004, p46
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the involvement of the author in the escape of a woman slave and her children from Kentucky to Ripley, Ohio. Reverend John Rankin disguised himself as a woman to provide a safe passage for the family. The plan is to retrieve the slaves from the house of Abe Courtney and accompany them in the skiff across the river. They were chased by slave hunters during the escape.
ACCESSION #
19535991

 

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