TITLE

CHAPTER FIVE: THE MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVE II: WILLIAM FAULKNER, ABSALOM, ABSALOM!; AYI KWEI ARMAH'S, WHY ARE WE SO BLEST?

AUTHOR(S)
KER, David I.
PUB. DATE
January 1998
SOURCE
African Novel & the Modernist Tradition;1998, p103
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
Chapter 5 of the book "The African Novel & the Modernist Tradition" is presented. The article examines the novels Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner and Why Are We So Blest? by Ayi Kwei Armah. A variety of consciousness on both novels reflect on the central story. These consciousness that ponder over the story are as much the center of focus as the story which their narratives seek to present.
ACCESSION #
19425866

 

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