TITLE

CHAPTER FOUR: Riders of the Train: Passage, Passing, and the Great Migration

AUTHOR(S)
Zabel, Darcy A.
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
Underground Railroad in African American Literature;2004, p121
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
The article presents a chapter of the book (Underground) Railroad in African American Literature. The chapter talked about the use of trains to signify the great migration. This migration can be a place or even a state of mind, depending on how it was used. The protagonists are passengers of the train of change, in which they undergo a personal transformation from their initial states.
ACCESSION #
19313808

 

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