TITLE

CHAPTER II: Fiction Before 1865

PUB. DATE
January 2003
SOURCE
Students' Guide to African American Literature, 1760 to the Pres;2003, p35
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
This chapter discusses African American fiction written before 1865. Available published works of fiction from the period include: Victor Séjour's short story, The Mulatto; Frederick Douglass's novella, The Heroic Slave; William Wells Brown's novel, Clotel; Frank J. Webb's novel, The Garies and Their Friends; Frances Ellen Watkins Harper's short stories, The Two Offers and The Triumph of Freedom--A Dream; Harriet E. Wilson's autobiographical novel, Our Nig; and Martin R. Delany's Blake.
ACCESSION #
19313794

 

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