TITLE

Mulford Foster: A Man Of Many Faces

AUTHOR(S)
Racine, Diane
PUB. DATE
March 2013
SOURCE
Journal of the Bromeliad Society;Mar-Jun2013, Vol. 63 Issue 1, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Biography
ABSTRACT
A biography of bromeliad enthusiast Mulford Foster is presented. His life phase began as a reptile collector to naturalist and lecturer later branching out to become an explorer and plant collector. He was born on December 25, 1888 and part of his growing up was spent exploring the woods around his home with his mother who also inspired him to make his own diminutive gardens with all sorts of mosses and wild plants. A memorial service on March 4, 1979 honored him and his philosophy.
ACCESSION #
89747604

 

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