TITLE

Kelvin, William Thomson (1824 - 1907)

PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
Hutchinson Dictionary of Scientific Biography;2005, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Biography
DOC. TYPE
Biography
ABSTRACT
Irish physicist who first proposed the use of the absolute scale of temperature, in which the degree of temperature is now called the kelvin in his honor. Thomson also made other substantial contributions to thermodynamics and the theory of electricity and magnetism, and he was largely responsible for the first successful transatlantic telegraph cable.
ACCESSION #
19931835

 

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