TITLE

An Exception to the Rule?: Keeping On Connally

AUTHOR(S)
Peckarsky, Peter
PUB. DATE
February 1975
SOURCE
New Republic;2/8/75, Vol. 172 Issue 6, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Questions the fact that former Treasury Secretary John B. Connally has held on to his position and security clearances as a member of the President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board (PFIAB) despite being indicted for perjury and bribery. Not guilty plea to all counts; Former President Richard Nixon's policy of immediately suspending a member of the Executive Branch indicted by a grand jury; Confirmation by Deputy Presidential Press Secretary John W. Hushen that President Gerald R. Ford knows of the Connally situation.
ACCESSION #
9988172

 

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