TITLE

Open Door Policy

PUB. DATE
June 2003
SOURCE
New Republic;6/16/2003, Vol. 228 Issue 23, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Argues that the United States has done a terrible job securing known sites where alleged Iraqi weapons of mass destruction (WMD) precursors were manufactured and stored. This failure has already allowed extremely dangerous material to fall into the hands of unknown, shadowy figures--precisely the outcome we fought the Iraq War to prevent. It is clear that the 101st Airborne Division did not subject the Al Kindi missile research and development facility in Mosul to a thorough inspection, nor did they fully secure the site. On May 9--nearly a month after entering Mosul-- U.S. forces found a tractor-trailer parked 50 feet outside Al Kindi's entrance. Last week, the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) announced that it suspects the truck was a mobile biological weapons laboratory; the CIA also announced that the truck "appears to have been looted." What happened at Al Kindi is part of a disastrous and underreported pattern. Remarkably, the Bush administration doesn't even appear to be trying very hard to recover the looted uranium, cesium, and cobalt.
ACCESSION #
9969421

 

Related Articles

  • Burden of Proof. Zengerle, Jason // New Republic;5/12/2003, Vol. 228 Issue 18, p11 

    Offers observations on the failure of the administration of United States President George W. Bush to find weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in Iraq, which would have justified the Iraq War. U.S. efforts to find those WMD have come up empty. Which is why the Bush administration is now...

  • Exaggerating The Threats. Zakaria, Fareed // Newsweek;6/16/2003, Vol. 141 Issue 24, p33 

    Discusses the possibility that the United States overstated the threat posed by weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. How the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency published an internal review of its threat assessments with regard to the Soviet Union in 1989; Suggestion that threat assessment must...

  • Mixed Signals in Ankara. Matthews, Owen; Kohen, Sami // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);6/16/2003 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 141 Issue 24, p24 

    Discusses the possibility that the United States overstated the threat posed by weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. How the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency published an internal review of its threat assessments with regard to the Soviet Union in 1989; Suggestion that threat assessment must...

  • Mixed Signals in Ankara. Matthews, Owen; Kohen, Sami // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);6/16/2003 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 141 Issue 24, p14 

    Discusses the possibility that the United States overstated the threat posed by weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. How the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency published an internal review of its threat assessments with regard to the Soviet Union in 1989; Suggestion that threat assessment must...

  • The Civilian Warrior. Williams, Daniel // Time International (South Pacific Edition);4/21/2003, Issue 15, p54 

    The article discusses the views of Australian Defense Minister Robert Hill on the Iraq War, 2003. Robert played a leading role in Operation Falconer, Australia's contribution to the war. He has been trying to build the case for an American-led invasion of Iraq to a divided Australian public. He...

  • LOOKING FOR A WAY OUT. Alter, Jonathan // Newsweek;11/28/2005, Vol. 146 Issue 22, p33 

    The author examines the debate over the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq. President George W. Bush, he says, genuinely believed that Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction. He also notes that it is simply false to say that Democrats had access to the same intelligence...

  • Friendly Fire. Drogin, Bob // New Republic;10/27/2003, Vol. 229 Issue 17, p23 

    The article focuses on the report by David Kay that Iraq had taken no significant steps to build nuclear weapons or produce fissile material after 1991 and that U.N. arms and trade sanctions had effectively constricted Saddam Hussein's abilities to develop chemical, biological, and nuclear...

  • International ARMS CONTROL. Gay, Kathlyn // Silent Death;2001, p64 

    This chapter discusses international arms control efforts to prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction. in 1928, the Geneva Protocol went into effect, condemning chemical and biological weapons. One of the earliest efforts to ban weapons of mass destruction (WMD) was the Nuclear...

  • WMDs: the biggest lie of all. Rosenheck, Dan; Stephens, Alex // New Statesman;8/25/2003, Vol. 132 Issue 4652, p16 

    Comments on the banning of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and chemical and biological weapons (CBW) by the United States and Great Britain, in light of their pre-emptive invasion of Iraq. Idea that the arms control policy discriminates against poor nations; View that CBW are no more dangerous...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics