TITLE

Why Carter's Big With Blacks

AUTHOR(S)
Bode, Ken
PUB. DATE
April 1976
SOURCE
New Republic;4/10/76, Vol. 174 Issue 15, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the growing popularity of Jimmy Carter, Senator from Georgia among the black community of the United States. Support for Carter from the blacks of all parts of the United States; Views that black support can earn critical margins for Carter and the black vote remains a major factor in the primaries; Views that Carter garnering the support of the blacks to oppose George Wallace, Senator from North Carolina; Votes against Wallace, not for Carter; Utilization for better campaign skills to woo the black voters; Support of Martin Luther King for Carter. INSET: The New Republic Votes..
ACCESSION #
9929863

 

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