TITLE

Iranamok

AUTHOR(S)
Kaplan, Lawrence F.
PUB. DATE
June 2003
SOURCE
New Republic;6/9/2003, Vol. 228 Issue 22, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the manner in which the administration of United States President George W. Bush is acknowledging a nuclear threat from Iran. When it comes to Iran's nuclear program, which could reach fruition within months, the administration's hard line amounts to this: the administration plans to take Iran to the United Nations. Or, more precisely, to protest Iranian violations of the Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and then hope the IAEA refers the matter to the United Nations, while trying to persuade China and Russia to cut off shipments of nuclear technology to Iran. And, if that doesn't work, there's always the broader policy of encouraging a popular uprising in Iran. These strategies have two things in common. First, they rely on actors other than the United States--the United Nations, the Russians, the Iranians themselves--to frustrate Iran's nuclear ambitions. Second, it's highly unlikely any of them will work. The administration will rely on the same multilateral institutions it ridiculed during the run-up to war with Iraq. Unfortunately, neither the IAEA strategy nor the democratic revolution strategy is likely to prevent Tehran from developing nuclear weapons.
ACCESSION #
9923821

 

Related Articles

  • Global Security Spotlight.  // Political Intelligence Briefing;7/28/2015, p8 

    The article discusses global security issues as they relate to Iran as of July 2015. Topics covered include the aggressive multilateral negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 countries of the U.S., the goal of reaching a landmark nuclear deal, and Iran's hope to prove that its nuclear...

  • Khamenei steadfast as nuclear talks resume.  // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;11/22/2013, Vol. 57 Issue 47, p21 

    The article reports on Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's warning that his country will not compromise on its right to develop nuclear power as Iran enters negotiations with several countries including the U.S., France and China on November 20, 2013.

  • Keeping the faith. Picco, Giandomenico // Harvard International Review;Summer92, Vol. 14 Issue 4, p30 

    Focuses on the role of the United Nations (UN) in diplomatic negotiations in international conflicts. Author's role in negotiating the freedom of Western hostages in Lebanon in October 1991 as Assistant UN Secretary General for Political Affairs; Importance of credibility for UN to deal with...

  • The Case Against the Case Against Iran: Regionalism as the West's Last Frontier. Shenna, John C. // Middle East Journal;Summer2010, Vol. 64 Issue 3, p341 

    Iran's leaders have reasons for spurning Western offers of engagement over Iran's nuclear program. They cannot so easily spurn approaches from Turkey and Arab neighbors. Regional engagement should therefore be encouraged, especially by Russia and China, to build confidence in Iran's intention to...

  • A Dangerous Deal. BOLTON, JOHN R. // National Review;2/10/2014, Vol. 66 Issue 2, p19 

    The article looks at U.S. and international policies toward Iran's nuclear weapons program, as of January 2014. The author criticizes the Joint Plan of Action interim agreement the U.S. and several other countries reached with Iran, saying it will significantly strengthen Iran through the...

  • US and Iran in talks on Iraq.  // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;5/18/2007, Vol. 51 Issue 20, p2 

    The article reports that the U.S. and Iranian government will hold talks for the future of Iraq. The negotiations will be held in Baghdad, Iraq. Patrick Clawson of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. stated that the U.S. would likely refuse to talk about other issues such as nuclear...

  • Reaching the Red Line. Clark, Mark Edmond // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);11/8/2004 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 144 Issue 19, p5 

    Focuses on international relations between the United States and Iran. Refusal of the U.S. to compromise over issues such as uranium-enrichment; Statement that moderate Iranians would have more influence over the conservative mullahs who run the country if the United States showed a willingness...

  • Reaching the Red Line. Clark, Mark Edmond // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);11/8/2004 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 144 Issue 19, p5 

    Focuses on international relations between the United States and Iran. Refusal of the U.S. to compromise over issues such as uranium-enrichment; Statement that moderate Iranians would have more influence over the conservative mullahs who run the country if the United States showed a willingness...

  • TURKEY-IRAN.  // Middle East Reporter (Daily Edition);4/7/2010, Vol. 191 Issue 4825, p8 

    The article reports on the skepticism by Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on the effectiveness of any further sanctions against Iran over its nuclear program. It states that Erdogan is criticizing countries pushing for another sanctions in the Security Council, and says that he still...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics