TITLE

One Way Out

AUTHOR(S)
Osborne, Jon
PUB. DATE
July 1974
SOURCE
New Republic;7/20/74, Vol. 171 Issue 3, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that U.S. President Richard Nixon stopped in Brussell, on his way to Soviet Union to attend the Soviet-American summit, to join other heads of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)governments in signing a Declaration on Atlantic Relations. Political significance of Nixon's journey to Moscow; Invitation by NATO Secretary General Joseph Luns to the heads of alliance governments to meet the President in Brussels; Argument pertaining to the refusal of the Soviet Union to accept any nuclear arms deal.
ACCESSION #
9919248

 

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