TITLE

DEVELOPMENT AND DISORDERS OF NEUROCOGNITIVE SYSTEMS FOR ORAL LANGUAGE AND READING

AUTHOR(S)
Booth, James R.; Burman, Douglas D.
PUB. DATE
July 2001
SOURCE
Learning Disability Quarterly;Summer2001, Vol. 24 Issue 3, p205
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
There are four goals of this article. First, a tentative neurocognitive model of oral language and reading is outlined. Second, our recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies (fMRI) on the development of oral language and reading are briefly reviewed with reference to this neurocognitive model. Third, brain-imaging research on dyslexia is discussed in light of the neurocognitive model. Fourth, research on the plasticity of neural systems and the implication of this plasticity for studying normative development and disorders is presented.
ACCESSION #
9889999

 

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