TITLE

What it takes to be a competitive supplier: Lessons from Bosch

AUTHOR(S)
Vasilash, Gary S.
PUB. DATE
August 1998
SOURCE
Automotive Manufacturing & Production;Aug98, Vol. 110 Issue 8, p56
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Looks at how Robert Bosch GmbH has been able to maintain its reputation as the leading automotive supplier worldwide. Listing of products supplied by the company; Financial profile of the company; Structure and composition of the company's workforce; In-depth look at how the company operates. INSETS: Making it in Feurbach;Evolution of electronics in vehicle control;Keeping on track.
ACCESSION #
988495

 

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