TITLE

Drinking cola linked to lower levels of vitamin D

PUB. DATE
October 2014
SOURCE
Daily Mail;10/7/2014, p36
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
CAN drinking cola lead to a lack of vitamin D? That's the suggestion from scientists at Laval University, in Canada, who asked more than 700 women about their intake of sugary drinks, including cola, other fizzy drinks and sweet fruit juice drinks.
ACCESSION #
98687274

 

Related Articles

  • Cola & Bone Density.  // Nutrition Action Health Letter;Dec2006, Vol. 33 Issue 10, p10 

    The article presents the findings of a study on the effect of drinking cola on hip bone density in women. Drinking at least three cans of cola a week--even diet cola--may lower hip bone density in women. Researchers studied the men and women participating in the Framingham Osteoporosis Study....

  • Cola vs. bones.  // Active Living: Newsletters;Jan2007, pN1 

    The article discusses the Framingham Osteoporosis Study, which shows that drinking three to four cans of cola drinks per week can lower bone density in women, but not in men. The research found 4% to 5% lower hip bone density in women who drank one cola a day, compared with women who drank less...

  • Study finds link between cola drinking, osteoporosis.  // Westchester County Business Journal;10/16/2006, Vol. 45 Issue 42, pS8 

    The article discusses the results on a study about the relations of drinking cola with osteoporosis. It was found cola drinking may contribute to lower bone mineral density in older women. This condition increases the risk for osteoporosis. Women who have consumed sugared cola had low bone...

  • Parkinson's Disease Linked to Low Vitamin D.  // Environmental Nutrition;Dec2008, Vol. 31 Issue 12, p1 

    The article reports on the findings of the study by researchers from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia regarding the role of vitamin D in Parkinsonism. The research found 55% of patients with Parkinson's disease had low levels of vitamin D compared to 41% of those with Alzheimer's disease....

  • Higher vitamin D levels linked to lower risk for pelvic floor disorders.  // Community Practitioner;Jun2010, Vol. 83 Issue 6, p41 

    The article reports on the survey conducted in Great Britain indicating that higher vitamin D levels are linked to a lower risk for female pelvic floor disorders.

  • Drinking cola is linked to lower levels of vitamin D.  // Daily Mail;10/14/2014, p24 

    CAN drinking cola lead to a lack of vitamin D? That's the suggestion from scientists at Laval University in Canada, who asked more than 700 women about their intake of sugary drinks, including cola, other fizzy drinks and sweet fruit juice drinks.

  • Vitamin D and Cancer: Where Does the Research Stand?  // American Institute for Cancer Research Newsletter;Summer2012, Issue 116, p12 

    The article discusses the latest research that has been undertaken on the potential of vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin in preventing cancer. Some large human studies link lower blood levels of vitamin D with greater risk of certain cancers, but overall these studies show mixed results. A number...

  • Vitamin D & MS.  // Nutrition Action Health Letter;Mar2007, Vol. 34 Issue 2, p12 

    The article discusses a study on the effect of vitamin D on multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease. Researchers compared vitamin D levels in blood samples from U.S. military personnel with MS and those without. Among whites, those with the highest blood vitamin D levels had a 62% lower...

  • A NEW LIGHT ON VITAMIN D. Vogel, J. Phillip // Life Extension;Apr2003, Vol. 9 Issue 4, p40 

    Reports on research findings on vitamin D. Sources of vitamin D; Factors influencing vitamin D levels; Impact of vitamin D deficiency; Persons who may need extra vitamin D to prevent deficiency; Links between vitamin D and Alzheimer's disease, cancer and osteoporosis.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of NEW JERSEY STATE LIBRARY

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics