TITLE

A Phenomenographic Approach To Examine The Different Ways HIV Patients Understand The Experience Of Counselling

AUTHOR(S)
Soon, Collyn Wai-Ching; Barnard, Alan
PUB. DATE
January 2001
SOURCE
Internet Journal of Mental Health;2001, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This paper describes the outcomes of research examining the different ways a group of HIV patients understood their experience of counselling. Many studies have been done in relation to types of counselling and evaluation of the effectiveness of counselling for HIV infected persons. However, no research has specifically analysed patient understanding of the experience of counselling. Having an insight of the counselling experience in HIV sufferers and understanding of what they have achieved from their experience is important and relevant to counsellors and other health care professionals as it can assist them to better respond to the needs of people with HIV and meet their expectations of health care workers. A phenomenographic approach was chosen to inquire into the qualitatively different ways of understanding the experience of counselling. The research results are presented in the form of four ways of understanding and an outcome space representing the logical relations between the counselling experience. The research confirmed that the counselling experience is understood and experienced as a way of assisting individuals who are seeking to accept the need to live with the presence of an infectious disease. Counselling assisted the HIV patients involved in the research by providing reassurance and comfort, because the news of the disease emotionally affected their lives. Counselling provided necessary information about the disease process, educated them about cultivating an appropriate lifestyle, and was a mechanism for mediation with family and friends. Unlike other diseases, findings reveal that individuals with HIV experience immense limitations to their lives due mainly to issues related to social stigmatisation. The research results inform health care professionals of patient experience and assists to further our understanding of both people with HIV and their expectations of health care workers.
ACCESSION #
9861288

 

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