Christer, R.; Robinson, E.V.; Raey, E.; Horgan, A.F.
April 2003
Gut;Apr2003 Supplement 1, Vol. 52, pA27
Academic Journal
Government's targets, including the 2 week cancer rule, derived from the New NHS: modern and dependable (1997) document have resulted in increased pressure on already stretched resources within the NHS. Managing increasing referrals within a shorter timeframe has therefore become more difficult. Following endoscopic investigations, the waiting time for outpatient review appointments for patients with colorectal conditions within many UK trusts is up to 3 months. This delay has an impact on the patients' experience, quality, and access to colorectal services. A prospective audit of 122 patients attending outpatient review appointments, identified the method of referral and the reason for review. This was broken down further as patients were allocated as to whether it would have been suitable for them to be reviewed by a nurse, either via nurse led clinic or by telephone. Patient satisfaction of current practice was assessed by means of a questionnaire. 78/122 suitable for nurse led follow up; 40 telephone follow up, 33 nurse led clinic; 49 patients discharged for hospital care following review appointment. We have therefore shown that the majority of patients (64%) referred with colorectal symptoms are suitable for nurse led follow up. We therefore intend to set up a nurse led follow up service that ultimately will provide a more efficient colorectal service, with improved utilisation of resources.


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