TITLE

IS CHEWING GUM EFFECTIVE IN REDUCING POSTPRANDIAL REFLUX IN THE OESOPHAGUS?

AUTHOR(S)
Moazzez, R.; Anggiansah, A.; Bartlett, D.
PUB. DATE
April 2003
SOURCE
Gut;Apr2003 Supplement 1, Vol. 52, pA19
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Introduction: Saliva is reported to have an important role in preventing damage by gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). Chewing gum stimulates the flow of saliva and initiates primary peristalsis. Consequently peristalsis clears the volume of the refluxate and then the saliva dilutes and neutralises the remaining acid in the oesophagus. However, this novel idea needs further investigation. Aim: This study was designed to assess the effect of chewing gum on postprandial GOR. The objective was to compare postprandial pH on the same patient on two occasions by keeping the experimental conditions identical. Method: A standard refluxogenic meal was devised with 60% fat using a computer program (comp.eat). 21 subjects with symptoms of GOR were chosen. Each subject had standard manometry followed by the insertion of the pH catheter. Subjects were given the refluxogenic meal on the first and the second day for lunch having starved for 4 h prior to eating the meal on both occasions. They were randomly selected to chew a piece of gum for half an hour after eating the meal on either the first or the second day. pH was measured for 2 h during the postprandial period on both occasions under the same conditions. Percentage time pH below 4 was compared for the two postprandial periods. Results: The mean (sd) and median (IQ range) values for the percentage time pH below 4 during the postprandial period without chewing gum were 9.2(8.9) and 5.8(2-13.5) respectively and with chewing gum 4.7(5.4) and 3.6(0.6-6.8). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.005). Discussion: Chewing gum significantly reduced postprandial reflux in these symptomatic patients who acted as their own controls. This study allowed the assessment of the role of chewing gum as the differential factor on the reduction of postprandial GOR. Conclusion: Chewing a piece of gum for half an hour after a refluxogenic meal significantly reduced acid exposure in the oesophagus during the postprandial period...
ACCESSION #
9747389

 

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