TITLE

Transcriptional regulation of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene by polymorphisms associated with adult-type hypolactasia

AUTHOR(S)
Kuokkanen, M.; Enattah, N.S.; Oksanen, A.; Savilahti, E.; Orpana, A.; Järvelä, I.
PUB. DATE
May 2003
SOURCE
Gut;May2003, Vol. 52 Issue 5, p647
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background and aims: The mechanism of the developmental downregulation of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) gene underlying adult-type hypolactasia is unknown. We have determined the functional significance of the recently identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), C/T[sub -13910] and G/A[sub -22018], associated with adult-type hypolactasia by studying LPH mRNA levels in intestinal biopsy samples with different genotypes. Methods: Intestinal biopsy samples were taken from 52 patients with abdominal complaints. Hypolactasia was diagnosed by determining lactase and sucrase activities and calculating their ratio (L/S ratio). The functional effect of the C/T[sub -13910] and G/A[sub -22018] genotype on expression of LPH mRNA was demonstrated in patients heterozygous for the C/T[sub -13910] and G/A[sub -22018] polymorphism and an informative expressed SNP located in the coding region of the LPH mRNA. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction followed by solid phase minisequencing was used for accessing the relative expression levels of the LPH alleles using informative SNPs located in exons 1, 2, 6, 10, 13, or 17 as markers. Results: Statistically significant differences between the three different genotypes CC[sub -13910] GG[sub -22018], CT[sub -13910] GA[sub -22018], and TT[sub -13910]AA[sub -22018] and their respective L/S ratios were observed. Relative quantitation of the expressed LPH alleles showed that the persistent allele represented 92 (6)% (mean (SEM), range 78-99%; n=14) of the expressed LPH mRNA. The patient with the homozygous persistent TT[sub -13910] AA[sub -22018], as well as hypolactasic patients with CC[sub -13910] GG[sub -22018], showed equal expression of both alleles (47 (1)%; n=7). Conclusions: Expression of LPH mRNA in the intestinal mucosa in individuals with T[sub -13910] A[sub -22018] alleles is several times higher than that found in individuals with C[sub -13910], G[sub -22018] alleles. These findings suggest that...
ACCESSION #
9737013

 

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