TITLE

Synthesis And Characterization Of Methylcellulose From Cotton Fibers (Gossypium Babardense)

AUTHOR(S)
Aomotoso, M.; Yafugborhi, E. L.
PUB. DATE
July 2014
SOURCE
Australian Journal of Basic & Applied Sciences;Jul2014, Vol. 8 Issue 10, p323
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Cellulose is a naturally occurring polysaccharide obtained from wood pulp and cotton that is Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, it is inexpensive and biocompatible. Modification of cellulose with hydrophobic side groups disrupts the rigid crystalline structure stabilized by strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding and improves the polysaccharide's water affinity. Two samples were synthesized and labeled methylcellulose A and methylcellulose B. The only difference in the process was the addition of fresh reactants hourly during the preparation of methylcellulose B. The methylcelluloses were produced from cellulose extracted from cotton fibers, using dimethyl sulfate as methylating agent under heterogeneous. The moisture content and viscosity of methylated samples was used to characterize the sample A. Intrinsic viscosity was evaluated to determine the viscosity average molecular weight of the synthesized water soluble methylcellulose A, using the Staudinger- Mark- Houwink equation. The infrared spectra of the cellulose and of the methylcellulose present significant differences at the regions from 3400 to 2900cm-1 and from 1500 to 800 cm-1. The main changes are the band intensity reduction around 3400cm-1 attributed to stretching of the O-H bond (hydroxyl groups) of the cellulose which was partially substituted by the methoxyl groups during the methylation reaction and increased intensity of the bands between 2903 to 2898 cm-1 attributed to the stretching of C-H aliphatics. The ratio between the absorption intensities of the C-H stretching band at around 2900 cm-1 and O-H stretching at around 3400 cm-1 for methylcellulose B is higher than for methylcellulose A, indicating that methylcellulose B showed an increase in the degree of substitution (DS). Methylcellulose A was water soluble with a peak viscosity at 57cP although it showed no pasting property whereas methyl cellulose (B) was water insoluble. The modification of methylcellulose preparation method from cotton fibers allows the production of a material with varying DS. The research shows that Cotton fibers can be used to produce high quality and high viscosity methylcellulose for a wide range of applications both domestically and industrially.
ACCESSION #
97368497

 

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