TITLE

PEELING THE SCAB OF POINSETTIA

AUTHOR(S)
Brooks Gould, Ann
PUB. DATE
July 2014
SOURCE
Greenhouse Management;Jul2014, Vol. 34 Issue 7, p86
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the management of the scab of poinsettia plant disease as of July 2014. Topics discussed include the disease's occurrence and the conditions that encourage its development, its symptoms and signs, and its control in greenhouses through proper sanitation and moisture management. Also mentioned is the need for careful application of pesticides.
ACCESSION #
97245004

 

Related Articles

  • The case of the feisty fungi. Daughtrey, Margery // Greenhouse Management;Feb2015, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p24 

    The article focuses on powdery mildew (PM) diseases which affect many greenhouse crops. PM are caused by fungi growing across the surface of plants which anchor to the epidermal cells, penetrate and absorb nutrients from them. Ornamentals including roses, begonias and poinsettias are affected by...

  • Poinsettia height control. Barrett, Jim // GPN: Greenhouse Product News;Aug96, Vol. 6 Issue 8, p12 

    Offers advice on selecting growth retardant treatments and drench application techniques for poinsettias. Difficulty with height control under warm conditions; Application of Cycocel chemical; Treatment with Bonzi and Sumagic; Comparison of drench applications and spray treatments; Freedom...

  • Tree-killing pathogen traced back to California. Yang, Sarah // California Agriculture;Oct-Dec2011, Vol. 65 Issue 4, p183 

    The article offers information on the research conducted related to devastate tree-killing fungus Seiridum cardinale, that is the cause of cypress canker disease.

  • PESTS, DISEASES AND DISORDERS: Box blight (Cylindrocladium buxicola). Denne, William; Dickerson, Tony; Halsall, Lucy; Larner, Jackie; Prior, Chris; Salisbury, Andrew // Garden;May2003, Vol. 128 Issue 5, p395 

    Box blight (Cylindrocladium buxicola), a defoliating fungal disease, has increasingly been causing trouble for gardeners. Hosts are Buxum sempervirens cultivars. Symptoms include brown spots on leaves, and black streaks on small stems. Its origin is unknown but was probably only recently...

  • Dry spells don't remove eyespot. Abel, Charles // Farmers Weekly;2/28/2003, Vol. 138 Issue 9, p62 

    Looks at the physiology and control of eyespot in plants. Reason for the dominance of W-type eyespot in crops; Comparison between eyespot and take-all; Effectiveness of Unix and Sportak.

  • Pitch battle. Russell, Geoff // Golf World;03/24/2000, Vol. 53 Issue 34, p4 

    Discusses information on pitch canker, a fungal disease, which is killing many of the Monterey pine trees at Pebble Beach Golf Links, California.

  • Officials discover mum white rust on East Coast.  // NMPRO - Nursery Management & Production;Jan2005, Vol. 21 Issue 1, p24 

    Reports on the discovery of chrysanthemum white rust in plants at nurseries in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and New York. Symptoms of the disease.

  • Circumstances ideal for bad eyespot year. Abel, Charles // Farmers Weekly;3/1/2002, Vol. 136 Issue 9, p68 

    Focuses on the occurrence of eyespot on wheat crop. Factors contributing to the growth of eyespot; Some of the things to consider when deciding to treat eyespot.

  • Good micro climate for disease. Abel, Charles // Farmers Weekly;3/1/2002, Vol. 136 Issue 9, p68 

    Reports that the micro-climate within thick, early drilled crops has been ideal for eyespot development. Risk of second wheats if they were sown early; Importance of knowing infection severity.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics