TITLE

Communicating with AG retailers...efficiency matters!

AUTHOR(S)
Finegan, John
PUB. DATE
November 1997
SOURCE
Agri Marketing;Nov/Dec97, Vol. 35 Issue 10, p37
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the results of a study which was conducted in an to discuss the best method of communication with agricultural applicatiors. Description of custom applicators; Which methods of information delivery were preferred; Details on data collected; What was revealed; Analysis of data collected.
ACCESSION #
9711173043

 

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