TITLE

Political reform gets a jump start

AUTHOR(S)
Jenkins Jr., Kent
PUB. DATE
October 1997
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;10/06/97, Vol. 123 Issue 13, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the revival of the drive to tighten campaign finance laws in September 1997. The opposition of a plan offered by senators John McCain of Arizona and Russell Feingold of Wisconsin by Republicans; How neither Republicans nor Democrats want to be seen as blocking reform, but neither wants to surrender its financial advantages.
ACCESSION #
9710025344

 

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