TITLE

A painful dilemma

AUTHOR(S)
Russell, Judi
PUB. DATE
August 1996
SOURCE
New Orleans CityBusiness (1994 to 2008);8/26/96, Vol. 17 Issue 7, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the issues concerning genetic testing of breast cancer in the United States. Loss of insurance coverage; Genetic mutation; Prevention of breast cancer; Advantages and disadvantages of genetic testing. INSET: How genetic testing is done..
ACCESSION #
9702024580

 

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