TITLE

Study reveals black and white children react differently to harsh discipline

PUB. DATE
December 1996
SOURCE
Jet;12/23/96, Vol. 91 Issue 6, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on how white and black children respond differently to being spanked. Also the revelation that child development research has frequently neglected cultural and ethnic distinction; Interpretation of findings.
ACCESSION #
9701124863

 

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