TITLE

Direct versus Translated Writing: The Effect of Translation on Learners' Second Language Writing Ability

AUTHOR(S)
Tavakoli, Mansoor; Ghadiri, Momene; Zabihi, Reza
PUB. DATE
June 2014
SOURCE
GEMA Online Journal of Language Studies;2014, Vol. 14 Issue 2, p61
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A growing body of research has been investigating how L2 writers, while writing in the second language (L2), make use of their first language (L1). In view of this, the present study was conducted to examine the effect of translation on the enhancement or deterioration of Iranian Elementary EFL learners' writing ability. The participants (N = 60) were prompted to perform two writing tasks: (a) writing directly in English (learners' L2) and (b) writing in their L1 (Persian) and then translating it into English. They were also assigned a checklist, a retrospective verbal report, to express their attitudes towards the two modes of writing. Analysis of the results revealed that although translation may be of help to some learners, it cannot be an effective strategy to enhance the writing ability of all learners. In effect, the results indicated that there was a significant difference between two writing tasks in terms of using expressions, transitions, and grammatical points. What was of particular interest to the authors was the fact that direct writing did not seem to be as direct as it was expected. The vast majority (75%) of students reported they think in Persian, as "often" or "always" while doing the English task in the direct writing mode. This finding suggests that teachers should incorporate translation strategies into their writing courses and explicitly teach students how to employ effective strategies in different situations. The provision of instruction and practice in using L1, particularly in planning and organizing learners' writings, may be of benefit to some learners in performing certain writing tasks.
ACCESSION #
96718313

 

Related Articles

  • The Evolving Identity of an Undergraduate Major in Writing and Linguistics. McGaughey, Barbara Jayne; Rentz, Aleyna; Nastal-Dema, Jessica // Composition Studies;Fall2015, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p190 

    The article presents the authors' views regarding the writing and linguistics courses offered at Georgia Southern University. Topics include the interrogated foundational texts and writing consideration, definition and scope of writing and aspects of do-it-yourself (DIY) nature of the program in...

  • Where We Are: Undergraduate Writing Majors & Concentrations. Bradley, Erin; Davis, Melissa; Dierlof, Michelle; Dmochowski, Keith; Gangi, John; Grobman, Laurie; Offenback, Kristy; Wilk, Melissa // Composition Studies;Fall2015, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p172 

    The article discusses the several curricular focal points depicting the collective passion for writing and desire for student's perspectives regarding the undergraduate writing major. Topics include the central significance of gateway course to writing studies, courses such as technical writing,...

  • English Majors are Professionals, Too: Liberal Arts and Vocation in the English Writing Major. Smith, Michelle; Costello, Michelle // Composition Studies;Fall2015, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p193 

    The article discusses aspects of professionalism in English majors depicting their vocation and liberal arts in their major of English writing. Topics include the interdisciplinary writing studies majors at other schools such as magazine writing, advertising writing and magazine, hostility...

  • Major Affordances: Collaborative Scholarship in a Department of Writing and Rhetoric Studies. Toth, Christie; Reber, Mitchell; Clark, Aaron // Composition Studies;Fall2015, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p197 

    The article presents the authors' views regarding the aspects of scholarship collaboration at Department of Writing and Rhetoric Studies in the University of Utah. Topics include the knowledge and abilities on digital scholarship, applied knowledge and high theory for writing studies and...

  • EIGHT REASONS TO ATTEND AN ACADEMIC WRITING COURSE. THE IMPACT OF ACADEMIC WRITING COURSES ON PARTICIPANTS. PAVLENKO, SONIA; BOJAN, CRISTINA // Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai, Philologia;Sep2014, Vol. 59 Issue 3, p209 

    Drawing on the available literature, the paper identifies the "uses" of academic writing courses for all types of potential participants answering the question: "Why should you attend an Academic Writing (AW) Course?" Eight major answers were identified. These are then structured in a table with...

  • Features of Orality, Academic Writing and Interaction in Asynchronic Student Discussion Forums. Skogs, Julie // Nordic Journal of English Studies;2014, Vol. 13 Issue 3, p54 

    This study employs quantitative and qualitative methods to compare the frequency and usage of selected linguistic features with a deictic function in discussion forum messages taken from three undergraduate courses in English. The main aim of the study was to examine how the written asynchronous...

  • WRITING AS A WAY OF DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNICATION COMPETENCE AND THINKING OF YOUNG LANGUAGE USERS. Kusá, Jana; Kopecký, WKamil; Polák, Milan; Hejsek, Lukáš; Marešová, Hana // International Multidisciplinary Scientific Conference on Social ;2015, p1185 

    Authors of the paper consider writing as a process of activation and further development of students' thinking. They introduce fundaments based on unsatisfactory state of a written expression of present young generation. It is often characterized by no concept, chaos, incoherence,...

  • THE CANNIBALS. Fitzgerald, Adam // Teachers & Writers;3/17/2015, p1 

    The article explains why high school students learn to hate poetry when they most want to express themselves and experiment with language.

  • An Intimate Discipline? Writing Studies, Undergraduate Majors, and Relational Labor. Geiger II, T. J. // Composition Studies;Fall2015, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p92 

    This article takes survey and interview responses from undergraduate writing majors in two independent writing programs as points of departure for reflection on the disciplinary work of writing studies. Though scholarship about writing majors focuses on these programs as sites for the...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics