TITLE

Prospective development and validation of a model to predict heart failure hospitalisation

AUTHOR(S)
Cubbon, R. M.; Woolston, A.; Adams, B.; Gale, C. P.; Gilthorpe, M. S.; Baxter, P. D.; Kearney, L. C.; Mercer, B.; Rajwani, A.; Batin, P. D.; Kahn, M.; Sapsford, R. J.; Witte, K. K.; Kearney, M. T.
PUB. DATE
June 2014
SOURCE
Heart;Jun2014, Vol. 100 Issue 12, p923
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective Acute heart failure syndrome (AHFS) is a major cause of hospitalisation and imparts a substantial burden on patients and healthcare systems. Tools to define risk of AHFS hospitalisation are lacking. Methods A prospective cohort study (n=628) of patients with stable chronic heart failure (CHF) secondary to left ventricular systolic dysfunction was used to derive an AHFS prediction model which was then assessed in a prospectively recruited validation cohort (n=462). Results Within the derivation cohort, 44 (7%) patients were hospitalised as a result of AHFS during 1 year of follow-up. Predictors of AHFS hospitalisation included furosemide equivalent dose, the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, AHFS hospitalisation within the previous year and pulmonary congestion on chest radiograph, all assessed at baseline. A multivariable model containing these four variables exhibited good calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow p=0.38) and discrimination (C-statistic 0.77; 95% CI 0.71 to 0.84). Using a 2.5% risk cut-off for predicted AHFS, the model defined 38.5% of patients as low risk, with negative predictive value of 99.1%; this low risk cohort exhibited <1% excess all-cause mortality per annum when compared with contemporaneous actuarial data. Within the validation cohort, an identically applied model derived comparable performance parameters (C-statistic 0.81 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.87), Hosmer-Lemeshow p=0.15, negative predictive value 100%). Conclusions A prospectively derived and validated model using simply obtained clinical data can identify patients with CHF at low risk of hospitalisation due to AHFS in the year following assessment. This may guide the design of future strategies allocating resources to the management of CHF.
ACCESSION #
96206309

 

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