TITLE

Childhood survival increasing

PUB. DATE
December 1996
SOURCE
International Family Planning Perspectives;Dec96, Vol. 22 Issue 4, p139
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that a study based on Demographic and Health Survey's data collected between 1990 and 1994, revealed that mortality rates among children younger than five are decreasing in the developing world. Decline in children's mortality rates in Nigeria; Names of two countries which experienced an increase in child mortality.
ACCESSION #
9612093801

 

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