TITLE

Two former KKK members plead guilty to two church arsons in South Carolina

PUB. DATE
September 1996
SOURCE
Jet;09/02/96, Vol. 90 Issue 16, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that Gary C. Cox and Timothy A. Welch were convicted for the arson of two Black churches in Greeleyville, South Carolina in June of 1995. Facing up to 55 years in prison; Their former involvement with the Ku Klux Klan (KKK); Suing of the Christian Knights of the KKK by Macedonia Baptist church; Details of the lawsuit; Other crimes against blacks committed by Cox and Welch.
ACCESSION #
9609117587

 

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