TITLE

How we let smoke get in our eyes

AUTHOR(S)
Hilts, Philip J.
PUB. DATE
June 1996
SOURCE
Nieman Reports;Summer96, Vol. 50 Issue 2, p98
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the media coverage of the health effects of tobacco smoking in the United States. Author's experience covering tobacco issues for `The New York Times' newspaper; History of research on the negative effects of tobacco smoking; Media reaction to the research; Reaction by tobacco companies to the research; Author's reporting of the activities by the tobacco companies to hide tobacco hazards.
ACCESSION #
9608232062

 

Related Articles

  • What Clinton and Dole didn't say: How to fix TV's vulture culture. Landay, Jerry M. // Christian Science Monitor;7/18/95, Vol. 87 Issue 162, p18 

    Focuses on the media culture in US and President Bill Clinton's decision to allow the `V-chip' technology in television sets to help parents to filter out violence. Position of the media industry; Value system in the commercial industry which influence American cultural life; Opinion of the...

  • Communication and Russia: Evolving media in a changing society. Wilson, Laurie J. // Social Science Journal;1995, Vol. 32 Issue 1, p109 

    Provides insights to the historical, cultural, economic and political forces shaping the Russian media in its present turmoil. Establishing the democratic institution; Political power struggles; Economic struggles; The challenge of corruption; Establishing the societal role; Professional and...

  • Public education about globalization: The role of the mass media. Foley, Griff // Convergence;1996, Vol. 29 Issue 4, p38 

    Discusses the role of mass media in effecting the public of political and economic change. Media's treatment of 1996 Australian election and its aftermath; Media's power to disseminate propaganda, a form of anti-education; Connection between propaganda and education; Propaganda and mass media...

  • Debunk the facades; preserve the mystique. Katterjohn, Chris // Indianapolis Business Journal;1/30/95, Vol. 15 Issue 45, p9A 

    Satirizes the role of mass media in shaping the perceptions of people toward the mystique of the aura of presidency in the United States. Author's apathy to President Bill Clinton's State of the Union Address; Comical description of the actuations of legislators in deference to the President's...

  • Remarks at the opening of session I of the family and media conference in Nashville, Tennessee. Clinton, Bill // Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents;7/17/95, Vol. 31 Issue 28, p1210 

    Presents the text of President Bill Clinton's remarks at the opening of session I of the family and media conference in Nashville, Tennessee on July 10, 1995. Increase in the number of children born out of wedlock; Number of hours devoted by public TV to educational programming; Proposal to...

  • Remarks at the closing of session I of the family and media conference in Nashville. Clinton, Bill // Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents;7/17/95, Vol. 31 Issue 28, p1212 

    Presents the text of President Bill Clinton's remarks at the closing of session I of the family and media conference in Nashville, Tennessee on July 10, 1995. Decline in the crime rate; Increase in the rate of random violence among very young people; Objectives of the `I Have a Future' program.

  • Remarks at the closing of session II of the family and media conference in Nashville. Clinton, Bill // Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents;7/17/95, Vol. 31 Issue 28, p1213 

    Presents the text of President Bill Clinton's remarks at the closing of session II of the family and media conference in Nashville, Tennessee on July 10, 1995. Praise for educational programs; Amount spent in a presidential election; Need to put positive message about education in TV programs.

  • Wired nation. Goldman, Debra // Adweek Eastern Edition;9/28/1998, Vol. 39 Issue 39, p54 

    Comments on the growth of mass media. Implications for marketers; Importance of understanding what the consumers mean; Unique way of protesting the loss of privacy.

  • The propaganda of the present. Rosen, Jay // Tikkun;Jan/Feb96, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p19 

    Reflects on the status of civic identity in the media age of the 1990s in the United States. Rearrangement of time and space to fit the imagination; Media's role in adjusting the supply of events to the audience demand; Elements of the propaganda of the present.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics