TITLE

PREVALENCE OF DERMATOPHYTIC INFECTION AND DETERMINING SENSITIVITY OF DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES

AUTHOR(S)
GUPTA SARIKA; AGRAWAL PURVA; RAJAWAT RAHUL; GUPTA SAKSHAM
PUB. DATE
July 2014
SOURCE
International Journal of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences;2014, Vol. 6 Issue 3, p35
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective: Dermatophytosis accounts for fungal skin diseases, the culprit organisms colonize the keratin tissues, thereby producing inflammatory reactions, restricted to the nonliving cornified layer of the epidermis. Additionally, it produces acid proteinases, elastase, keratinases, other proteinases reportedly act as virulence factors. The present work aims at evaluation of rate of incidences of dermatophytic infections (group wise), and etiological agents with associated symptoms. In addition, we also determine to test the sensitivity of present diagnostic procedures. Methods: Samples from 150 case studies were collected and subjected to KOH test and culture test. Results: Out of 150 case studies of clinically suspected patients, 74% (111) patients were males and 26 % (39) were females. Among the patient data, 70.27% (78 out of 111) males and 82.05% (32 out of 39) females were found to be infected on the basis of KOH test and culture test. Maximum infection was reported from groin 32.67% (49) followed by hands/legs 21.33% (32) and thighs 15.33% (23). 84% of the KOH positive samples showed positive test for culture, thereby indicating its high sensitivity as diagnostic tool. The maximum relative percent occurrence (RPO) was shown by Aspergillus sp. (29.33%) followed by Trichophyton sp. (21.33%), Fusarium sp. (12.67%), Microsporum sp. (11.33%) and Cladosporium sp. (11.33%). Conclusion: Our finding showed that infection is more pronounced in male than female. However, the KOH test was positive in 126 cases and 118 cases were fungal culture positive. Sensitivity of the KOH test is 84% as compared with reference standard culture test. Our findings suggest that KOH test can be used for diagnosis of dermatophillic infections in remote conditions where rapid and low cost diagnosis is required.
ACCESSION #
96062569

 

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