TITLE

Term Hoosier traced to black preacher

PUB. DATE
May 1996
SOURCE
Christian Century;5/08/96, Vol. 113 Issue 16, p506
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that William Piersen, a historian at the Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, has traced the work `Hoosier' to Harry Hoosier, a black methodist preacher of the late 18th and 19th centuries who never set foot in the state of Indiana. `Hoosiers' as term of reference to converts of the uneducated black preacher; Use of the term in Indiana to describe a rough-edged frontiersman.
ACCESSION #
9605143014

 

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