TITLE

THE ENDLESS ALLURE AND ULTIMATE FOLLY OF DETERMINING THE ORIGINAL MEANING OF THE CONSTITUTION: HISTORY, LAW, POLITICS, AND THE AMERICAN FOUNDING

AUTHOR(S)
Estes, Todd
PUB. DATE
March 2014
SOURCE
XVIII: New Perspectives on the Eighteenth Century;Spring2014, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the Ratification debates of 1787-1788 of the United States Constitutional convention to considers flaws in the theory of Originalism, the notion first forwarded by U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese in 1985 that federal laws can be interpreted with an understanding of the Founding Fathers' "original intention." Topics considered include accounts of political debates published in American newspapers, the compiled essays known as "The Federalist," and the voting margins of states' ratification of the Constitution.
ACCESSION #
96044288

 

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