TITLE

Making your way through the margarine maze

AUTHOR(S)
Schepers, Anastasia
PUB. DATE
April 1996
SOURCE
Environmental Nutrition;Apr96, Vol. 19 Issue 4, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the varieties of margarines and margarine substitutes available and offers information on how to differentiate between these varieties. Margarine regulations set by Nutrition Labeling and Education Act, 1993 (NLEA); Constituents of reduced fat margarines; What vegetable oil spreads are. INSET: What to use in the kitchen and at the table..
ACCESSION #
9604195999

 

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