TITLE

IS EVERYTHING RACE?

AUTHOR(S)
Kennedy, Randall
PUB. DATE
January 1996
SOURCE
New Republic;1/1/96, Vol. 214 Issue 1, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Argues that U.S. Democrats appear to have lost the ability to debate public policy without resorting to formulaic invocations of racial discrimination. Reference to the debate over the sentencing disparity over crack and powder cocaine as of January 1996; Disparity in the sentences for possession of crack and powder cocaine under federal law; Facts that support the argument of racism in the crack law.
ACCESSION #
9601111935

 

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