TITLE

Saliva Composition and Exercise

AUTHOR(S)
Chicharro, J.L.; Lucía, A.; Pérez, M.; Vaquero, A.F.; Ureña, R.
PUB. DATE
July 1998
SOURCE
Sports Medicine;Jul1998, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Little attention has been directed toward identifying the changes which occur in salivary composition in response to exercise. To address this, our article first refers to the main aspects of salivary gland physiology. A knowledge of the neural control of salivary secretion is especially important for the understanding of the effects of exertion on salivary secretion. Both salivary output and composition depend on the activity of the autonomic nervous system and any modification of this activity can be observed indirectly by alterations in the salivary excretion. The effects of physical activity (with reference to factors such as exercise intensity and duration, or type of exercise protocol) on salivary composition are then considered. Exercise might indeed induce changes in several salivary components such as immunoglobulins, hormones, lactate, proteins and electrolytes. Saliva composition might therefore be used as an alternative noninvasive indicator of the response of the different body tissues and systems to physical exertion. In this respect, the response of salivary amylase and salivary electrolytes to incremental levels of exercise is of particular interest. Beyond a certain intensity of exercise, and coinciding with the accumulation of blood lactate (anaerobic threshold or AT), a ‘saliva threshold’ (Tsa) does indeed exist. Tsa is the point during exercise at which the levels of salivary α-amylase and electrolytes (especially Na) also begin to rise above baseline levels. The occurrence of the 2 thresholds (AT and Tsa) might, in turn, be attributable to the same underlying mechanism, that of increased adrenal sympathetic activity at high exercise intensities.
ACCESSION #
9593772

 

Related Articles

  • Saliva research leads to new diagnostic tools and therapeutic options. Kefalides, Paul T. // Annals of Internal Medicine;12/21/99, Vol. 131 Issue 12, p991 

    Focuses on saliva's role in oral health and approaches to therapy for salivary deficiency. Trace concentrations of physiologic compounds in saliva; Cortisol in saliva; Salivary proteins with antimicrobial activity; Bacterial ecology of the mouth; Saliva's role in maintenance of tooth enamel.

  • oligoptyalism.  // Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary (2009);2009, Issue 21, p1627 

    A definition of the term "oligoptyalism" which refers to insufficient secretion of saliva is presented.

  • TOWARD MOLECULARLY BASED DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE ORAL CAVITY. Slavkin, Harold S. // Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA);Aug98, Vol. 129 Issue 8, p1138 

    Discusses the use of saliva to detect diseases and chemicals in the body. Composition of saliva, which is mostly made of water; Blood cells, microbes, oral epithelial cells, and other substances which are present in saliva; Pathogens which are responsible for caries and periodontitis;...

  • THE EFFECT OF ANTIHISTAMINIC DRUGS ON SALIVARY FLOW AND VISCOSITY. McDONALD, RALPH E. // Journal of Dental Research;Apr1953, Vol. 32 Issue 2, p224 

    The article examines the impact on salivary flow and its viscosity of antihistamines. An experiment is described and results are discussed. Depending upon the antihistamine administered, salivary flow was either substantially diminished or somewhat increased. Some of the drugs increased salivary...

  • EFFECT OF GONADECTOMY AND SEX HORMONES ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE RAT SALIVARY GLANDS. SHAFER, WILLIAM G.; MUHLER, JOSEPH C. // Journal of Dental Research;Apr1953, Vol. 32 Issue 2, p262 

    The article examines how gonadectomies and sex hormones affect the structure of the salivary glands in rats. An experiment is described and results are discussed. Among insights gleaned was that both male and female rats administered gonadectomies had smaller and fewer secretory tubules in...

  • THE INHIBITORY ACTION OF SALIVA ON THE IN VITRO GROWTH OF BETA HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI. BARTELS, HENRY A.; BLECHMAN, HARRY; CAVALLARO, JOHN // Journal of Dental Research;Aug1958, Vol. 37 Issue 4, p654 

    The article investigates whether in vitro growth of beta hemolytic streptococci is inhibited by saliva. An experiment is described and results are discussed. Findings reveal an inhibitory effect, with the factor involved distinct from lysozome, and possibly related to oral microbial flora. The...

  • A SELECTIVE MEDIUM FOR LACTOBACILLI COUNTS FROM SALIVA. DIAMOND, BEN ELKAN // Journal of Dental Research;Feb1950, Vol. 29 Issue 1, p8 

    The author reports on a study that was completed which looked at lactobacilli counts found on saliva. The various conditions in which the lactobacilli counts increased are mentioned. Steps that were taken by researchers to eliminate the impact of bacteria that already existed in the laboratory...

  • SALIVA AND DENTURE RETENTION. Shetty, Nitesh; Dandekeri, Savita; Prabhu, Vishnudas // Guident;2011, Vol. 4 Issue 11, p22 

    The article discusses the role of saliva in the retention of the denture. It cites the percentage of contribution by the glands during unstimulated salivary flow. Physical factors which affect retention rate include adhesion, cohesion, and inter-facial surface tension. Detrimental factors of...

  • Protection by selenium of lead-acetate-induced alterations on rat submandibular gland function. Abdollahi, M.; Rahmat-Jirdeh, N.; Soltaninejad, K. // Human & Experimental Toxicology;Jan2001, Vol. 20 Issue 1, p28 

    Pure submandibular saliva was collected intraorally by micro polyethylene cannulation of anaesthetized rats using pilocarpine as a secretagogue. Twenty-four days treatment with lead acetate 0.05% in drinking water altered salivary function. Except for flow rate that was (P<0.01) increased by...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics