TITLE

Sudden Impact

AUTHOR(S)
Becker, Jasper
PUB. DATE
April 2003
SOURCE
New Republic;4/21/2003, Vol. 228 Issue 15/16, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In the six months since North Korea began publicly threatening to build nuclear weapons, two of its largest trading partners--China and South Korea--have largely buried their heads in the sand. At the end of winter 2003, North Korea threatened to unleash a war and test-fired missiles into the Sea of Japan; China complacently repeated that the problem was one for the U.S. to solve. But, China and South Korea increasingly have switched course and have begun supporting Washington's tougher line on North Korea. In fact, for the first time since the U.S. President George W. Bush administration came into office, a workable North Korea policy is taking shape. But this newfound regional coherence isn't due to the Bush administration's actions in Northeast Asia. It is a dividend from the war in Iraq. Before late February 2003, China and South Korea kept silent on, or even opposed, U.S. efforts to deal with North Korea. while the media has focused elsewhere, the Bush administration has leveraged its Iraq policy to break the diplomatic impasse in Northeast Asia. In late February, say diplomatic sources in Beijing, Secretary of State Colin Powell told China's new leader, Hu Jintao, that many hawks in Washington believe the only solution to North Korea is regime change--if necessary, by military means. Short of that, he warned that the United States might undertake a preemptive strike against Yongbyon, a nuclear reactor capable of making weapons-grade plutonium, to prevent North Korea from building nuclear weapons. In Beijing's mind, the Iraq war shows Powell wasn't bluffing. Diplomats in Beijing say China believes it has only a brief window to prevent an Iraq-like war from exploding near its borders and thus has drawn closer to the U.S. position. This belief in Washington's willingness to launch preemptive action against North Korea has led China to move quickly.
ACCESSION #
9535825

 

Related Articles

  • War Games. Eberstadt, Nicholas // Time International (South Pacific Edition);3/24/2003, Issue 11, p42 

    Argues that King John Il is scheming to exploit the war on Iraq for his own purposes. War with Iraq that is imminent; Politics of North Korea; Belief that North Korea will not attempt a surprise assault against South Korea; Relationship of North Korea with China and Russia; Possibility that...

  • Talking Only Makes it Worse. Eberstadt, Nicholas // Time International (South Pacific Edition);2/5/2007, Issue 4, p41 

    In this article, the author comments on how North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il continues to develop nuclear weapons even as the six-party diplomatic talks progress. The author notes that the diplomatic talks have made no real progress, but Kim Jong Il seems to be making continual progress with...

  • GOOD NEWS BAD NEWS.  // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);11/13/2006 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 148 Issue 20, p5 

    This article looks at good news and bad news surrounding the on-again, off-again six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear-weapons program. The good news is that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il's regime came back to the table after facing U.N. sanctions, the bad news is that there are now more...

  • GOOD NEWS BAD NEWS.  // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);11/13/2006 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 148 Issue 20, p5 

    This article looks at good news and bad news surrounding the on-again, off-again six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear-weapons program. The good news is that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il's regime came back to the table after facing U.N. sanctions, the bad news is that there are now more...

  • Security Overview.  // North Korea Defence & Security Report;2012, p68 

    The article discusses the domestic security issues concerning North Korea in 2012. It notes the security threat posed by the possibility that the regime of Kim Jong Il will weaken to the point that it no longer controls large parts of the country, or collapses outright. It also cites the...

  • Nuclear nightmare. Dobbs, Lou // U.S. News & World Report;5/5/2003, Vol. 134 Issue 15, p32 

    Discusses nuclear threats in North Korea to geopolitcs and economics in the world. Economic conditions in North Korea; Decision of the North Korean government and Kim Jong Il to pour resources into its military; Admission by North Korea to having at least one nuclear bomb; Ballistic missile...

  • The Koreas: Eight Post-Nuclear Test Dynamics.  // Emerging Markets Monitor;6/1/2009, Vol. 15 Issue 9, p1 

    The article identifies several major market dynamics, following the second nuclear test of North Korea on May 25, 2009. It relates that the second nuclear test is part of the efforts of Korean leader Kim Jong II to reassert his leadership following a long period of illness. It talks about the...

  • A Gate Crasher in the Most Dangerous Club. Powell, Bill // Time;12/25/2006, Vol. 168 Issue 26, Following p80 

    The article focuses on North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il and his efforts to regain the attention of U.S. President George W. Bush in 2006. When negotiations about Kim's nuclear program stalled he disrupted the fourth of July, America's independence day, by launching a ballistic-missile test. In...

  • A Gate Crasher in the Most Dangerous Club. Powell, Bill // Time International (South Pacific Edition);12/25/2006, Issue 51/52, p60 

    The article focuses on North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il and his efforts to regain the attention of U.S. President George W. Bush in 2006. When negotiations about Kim's nuclear program stalled he disrupted the fourth of July, America's independence day, by launching a ballistic-missile test. In...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics