TITLE

Our Overstuffed Armed Forces

AUTHOR(S)
Korb, Lawrence J.
PUB. DATE
November 1995
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Nov/Dec95, Vol. 74 Issue 6, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on issues related to the defense spending policy proposed by the administration of U.S. President Bill Clinton for 1996 and 1997. In the debate over the size of defense appropriations, Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich stated that the present military budget is far above what is necessary to defend the nation. But, Gingrich says, the excess is a premium the U.S. pays to carry out its role as a world leader. The Clinton defense program, which will cost about $260 billion a year, calls for maintaining a total force of 2.5 million people, 1.5 million active and 1 million reserve. There will be 19 ground divisions, 12 carrier battle groups with 346 ships, 20 air wings, and 184 bombers. This conventional force will be backed by 3,500 strategic nuclear weapons.
ACCESSION #
9511264102

 

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