TITLE

Toxic effects of methylmercury, arsanilic acid and danofloxacin on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into neural cells

AUTHOR(S)
Seok-Jin Kang; Sang-Hee Jeong; Eun-Joo Kim; Young-Il Park; Sung-Won Park; Hyo-Sook Shin; Seong-Wan Son; Hwan-Goo Kang
PUB. DATE
January 2014
SOURCE
Journal of Veterinary Science;2014, Vol. 15 Issue 1, p61
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This study was performed to assess the neurotoxic effects of methylmercury, arsanilic acid and danofloxacin by quantification of neural-specific proteins in vitro. Quantitation of the protein markers during 14 days of differentiation indicated that the mouse ESCs were completely differentiated into neural cells by Day 8. The cells were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of three chemicals during differentiation. Low levels of exposure to methylmercury decreased the expression of GABAA-R and Nestin during the differentiating stage, and Nestin during the differentiated stage. In contrast, GFAP, Tuj1, and MAP2 expression was affected only by relatively high doses during both stages. Arsanilic acid affected the levels of GABAA-R and GFAP during the differentiated stage while the changes of Nestin and Tuj1 were greater during the differentiating stage. For the neural markers (except Nestin) expressed during both stages, danofloxacin affected protein levels at lower concentrations in the differentiated stage than the differentiating stage. Acetylcholinesterase activity was inhibited by relatively low concentrations of methylmercury and arsanilic acid during the differentiating stage while this activity was inhibited only by more than 40 µM of danofloxacin in the differentiated stage. Our results provide useful information about the different toxicities of chemicals and the impact on neural development.
ACCESSION #
95103803

 

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