TITLE

Strategies for increasing African-American parental participation in the special education process

AUTHOR(S)
Harrison, Lorraine H.; Arnold, Mitylene B.
PUB. DATE
September 1995
SOURCE
Journal of Instructional Psychology;Sep95, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p230
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Provides a review of the contemporary professional literature related to the participation of African-American families in the special education process. Reasons given for lack of parental participation in public school activities; Successful strategies to increase parental participation; Improvement of interaction between parents and professionals.
ACCESSION #
9510136584

 

Related Articles

  • African American Parents: Improving Connections With Their Child's Educational Environment. Brandon, Regina P. // Intervention in School & Clinic;Nov2007, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p116 

    The article discusses the involvement of African American parents with their child's educational environment. The author states that African American parents in particular typically have a weak connection with their child's educational experience. The author highlights factors that impede parent...

  • Transition to adult services: Support for ongoing parent participation. Brotherson, Mary Jane; Berdine, William H. // Remedial & Special Education;Jul/Aug93, Vol. 14 Issue 4, p44 

    Discusses five strategies that special educators can use to support parents and young adults with disabilities in making a successful transition into adulthood. Sociohistorical context, stressors on parents, burnout of parents of young adults with disabilities.

  • School Counselors Collaborating with African American Parents. Bradley, Carla; Johnson, Phillip; Rawls, Glenda; Dodson-Sims, Arlana // Professional School Counseling;Jun2005, Vol. 8 Issue 5, p424 

    Parent participation has been strongly linked to student success. Yet, in urban schools, African American parents often are uninvolved. This article presents eight strategies that school counselors can use to better collaborate with African American parents.

  • 10 WAYS PARENTS CAN HELP TO CLOSE THE GAP. Perry, Steve // Essence (Time Inc.);Apr2010, Vol. 40 Issue 12, p146 

    The article offers tips for African American parents on how to encourage educational success in their children. The importance of selecting a school with teachers who are engaged with students is noted. It is cited that the intellectual development of children is promoted by reading. Parents are...

  • DAMAGE CONTROL. Maran, Merdith // Teacher Magazine;Aug/Sep2001, Vol. 13 Issue 1, p24 

    Discusses the implementation of the Parents of Children of African Descent (PCAD) educational program at Berkeley High School in California. Findings on the literacy and proficiency of African American students in the country; Discussion on the desegregation of schools at the Berkeley Unified...

  • Mom and Dad Know Best. LATOUR, FRANCIE // Essence (Time Inc.);Feb2012, Vol. 42 Issue 10, p98 

    The article discusses the necessity for African-American parents to prepare their children for school. Parents in major urban centers are using open-ended conversations and everyday routines in teaching their children. Based on studies, creating a lifestyle of imaginative everyday learning is...

  • High School Teachers and African American Parents: A (Not So) Collaborative Effort to Increase Student Success. Wallace, Matt // High School Journal;Feb/Mar2013, Vol. 96 Issue 3, p195 

    This is a case study about a group of African American parents that banded together in an effort to increase their own involvement, the involvement of other African American parents, and the success of African American students at one public high school. The various ways in which this group of...

  • African American Parental Involvement in Their Children's Middle School Experiences. Archer-Banks, Diane A. M.; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S. // Journal of Negro Education;Spring2008, Vol. 77 Issue 2, p143 

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence African American parents' involvement in their children's middle school experiences. Two focus group interviews were conducted with African American parents. While the participants viewed parent involvement as important, they...

  • Group Urges Mandatory Black-History Studies.  // Education Week;3/18/1987, Vol. 6 Issue 25, p3 

    The article reports on the demand from African American parents to implement a mandatory course in African American history in 1987 in at St. Paul schools in Minnesota, following the district school board decided to integrate multicultural and gender-equality courses. Reverend James Battle,...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics