TITLE

Interactions of communication partners and students who are deaf-blind: A model

AUTHOR(S)
Heller, K. Wolff; Alberto, P.A.
PUB. DATE
September 1995
SOURCE
Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness;Sep/Oct95 Part 1 of 2, Vol. 89 Issue 5, p391
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines the various forms of communication systems of deaf-blind students and their communication partners. Demands of communication systems; Characteristics of the communication partner model; Expansion of the deaf-blind students' communication systems; Other areas of communication which require expansion.
ACCESSION #
9510071560

 

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